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20130121
20130129
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KQEH (PBS) 13
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English 13
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
our competitive edge. some say it's because america's fragile economy is a distraction for corporate america. others point to our inferior infrastructure and sub-par public education. but adam segal, author of "advantage," says the big problem is others are gaining ground. >> we have been kind of running in place for the last three or four years because of the recession, spending on r&d, and big ideas seem to be fairly scarce while china just continues to funnel more and more money into it. >> reporter: still many argue the u.s. will always be extremely competitive because we are the most innovative country in the world. what better place to witness innovation at work than at i.b.m. in westchester county, new york. this is the home of watson, big blue's super computer. watson was clever enough to beat "jeopardy" champions at their own game just a few years ago. now, i.b.m. researchers are working on new uses for the brainiac computer, particularly in the field of medicine. bernie meyerson calls himself i.b.m.'s head geek. he says innovation is critical for companies and societies to
the downside. >> i don't think that people have been overly optimistic on the economy. and, we've seen autos really rebounding over the last year. we're really starting to see improvement in the housing market. so, i think those are some very fundamental pieces of the economy that could really lead to some stronger growth in the future. >> reporter: as for retail investors rediscovering stocks this january, not everyone thinks the reunion is for real. some experts say the market will have to rally a lot longer before that happens. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: from a smartphone in your hand to a smartphone in your glasses, still ahead, the latest fashion trend: wearable technology. exxon-mobil is back on top. it's reclaimed the coveted title as the world's most valuable company. apple now slips to number two. exxon is worth an estimated $417 billion and apple is $4 billion less. since apple hit $700 a share in september. it has lost roughly $250 billion in value. the change comes exactly one year after the tech titan knocked the oil giant out of the top spot. shares of microso
republican colleagues economic uncertainty is bad for the economy. guess what? it is. and yet that's exactly what you are doing. another big dose of economic uncertainty. >> reporter: republicans shifted gears on the debt ceiling after a strategy session last week. worried that they have lost the public debate, republicans were clearly trying out a new message today. >> balancing the budget over the next ten years means we save the future for our kids and our grandkids. it also means that we strengthen programs like social security and medicare and medicaid that can't continue to exist in current form without some kind of controls. >> reporter: there is just one problem. democrats argue the "no budget no pay provision" violates the constitution's 27th amendment which says any changes congress makes in its pay can't take effect until after the next election. >> we should not say to a member, "if you think the budget before you is not good for the country, vote against it and you won't get paid. if you think it's not good for the country, you better vote for it because you have a mortgage paym
: and the former vice chairman of the federal reserve, talks with us about the debt crisis, the economy and the fed. alan blinder joins us. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: just a single cent higher. earnings from software "giant" microsoft were only a penny more than what analysts were expecting. microsoft shares slipped as much as 2% on the news in after hours trading. here are the numbers: microsoft earned $0.76 a share, down 3.7% from a year ago. revenues rose more than 2.5% to $21.5 billion, but also below expectations. the results mark the first quarter to include sales of microsoft's new windows 8 operating system, and its tablet computer, the "surface". sales of its windows division jumped 24%, but no financial details on the surface tablet. we'll have more analysis on microsoft, in a just a moment. >> tom: the other big tech story today: apple and its big fall following yesterday's lackluster results. the stock lost 12% of its value or $63 a share, closing at $450 and change. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: no doubt this was a sour day for investors. not only did th
, or maybe it's that the economy is finally building a stronger foundation. whatever the cause, the effect is that the dow, s&p 500 and nasdaq are all are up more than 4% in the first three weeks of this year. wall street veteran art cashin says with interest rates still so low, investors have a new taste for equities, particularly pension funds. >> they've got to up their risk profile, and therefore they're going to buy stocks. and some of that money is coming in not wildly, not open-armed, but somewhat reluctantly. but this is the only road i can take. >> reporter: even with all the positive momentum on wall street, there's still a bit of nervousness about earnings season. less than 20% of s&p 500 names have reported, and so far the results are just okay. a close look at the numbers show 62% of companies have topped wall street expectations. that's in line with the average since 1994 but below the 65% of the past year. still, it's the red flags companies like dupont are raising about this year that are getting noticed. today, the largest u.s. chemical firm tempered expectations about its
, that we really don't know for sure where the economy is going. we don't know if that was a temporary thing. we don't know if it was money that came in early because of the federal tax concerns and the people who are the most wealthy in california paying early. the bottom line is we don't really know what those revenues are. i think the governor wants to wait and see what they are before he starts talking about those restorations. you know what, one of the really fascinating things in this speech, the governor made a point of saying, you know, just giving money back to people only to take it away when the economy goes bad is cruel. it's not progressive. it is bad politics. it's bad for the people. it's bad governing. i'm not going to go back and do that. i think you are going to hear the governor make this time and again that we want these programs, but if it's not long-term sustainable money, we shouldn't be spending it. >> since you're talking about long-term projects, john, he still wants the water tunnels. he still wants high-speed rail. how realistic are those goals given that there's
a decent economy here if working people have no rights. if people can't bargain with their employer, there is no place in the world where people who bargain can't raise their wages. i think our strategy is to link core issues together so that it's not just, quote, labor or particularly organized labor. as you said, 12%, and that includes the public sector. private sector is under 7%. it's not just labor talking about workers' rights, it's all of us who have a vision of economic justice. let's do something about economic inequality. let's figure out how to stig stigmatize the rising economy. i was at a meeting in california of young new stewards on saturday. this is 7 to 10 years. i've been doing this my whole life. i may not be there at the end of that period, but i'm sure, absolutely certain, that without that kind of basic movement in this country, not just the traditional union agenda, we don't have a chance. on the other hand, with that kind of agenda, i absolutely believe we can change this country as president obama talked about in 2008. the change you can believe in, the chan
that happen in eroding trust and really hurting the economy are legal. this is legal. what amgen did now is legal. should it be? is it ethical? is it the right thing for the country? absolutely not. but they literally accomplished in the back room, with their access to important people, what they could never have accomplished on the floor of the house or on the floor of the senate. >> congressman, people out there -- you're right, people out there are disgusted. but they're also despairing. they've seen this time and again. we report on it. they see it. they get angry. and then nothing happens. >> well, that's right. and that's why i'm so glad that congressman hanna, we've got a bipartisan bill here. >> a republican. >> a republican, a very good member from new york. and there's a lot of us who really take seriously that we've got two jobs. one is to try to make good decisions on policy that are going to get america going again, but the other, and each of us with a vote has this job, is to try to restore trust in the institution. and that means that when there is this kind of egregious r
economy requires railroads and highways to speed travel and commerce, schools and colleges to train our workers. together we discovered that a free market only -- and fair play. together we resolve that a great nation must care for the vulnerable and protect its people from life's worst hazards and misfortunes. through it all we have never relinquished, nor have we succumb to the fiction that all society's ills can be cured through government alone. our celebration of initiatives and enterprise, our insistence on hard work and personal responsibility, these are constant in our character. we have always understood that when times change so must we. that fidelity to our funding principles requires new responses to new challenges. our individual requires collective action, the american people can no more meet the demands of today's world by acting alone than american soldiers that met the forces of fascism or communism with musicales and militias, no single person can train all the math and science teachers we'll need to equip our children for the future or builds the roads and networks an
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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